History of Daylight Saving Time: Why do we Spring Forward?

Recent Changes in Daylight Saving Time

Indeed, the new rules for DST that began in 2007 meant an extra four or five weeks of DST each year. There are now a total of 238 days of DST, compared to a total of 210 days of DST back in 2006 under the previous rules. This means the U. S. remains on DST for about 65% of the year. So if you think about it, DST will be in effect for most of the year, Standard time is no longer the standard. It might be more significant to recognize Daylight Losing Time.

Starting Daylight Saving Time

DST begins each year at 2:00 a.m. on the second Sunday in March in most of the United States and its territories. However, some places have not bought into this campaign. It is not observed in Hawaii, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, nor in the state of Arizona — except for the Navajo Indian Reservation — which does observe DST.

Daylight Saving Time Energy Savings?

A Department of Energy study was released in early November 2008, showing that Daylight Saving Time does, in fact, save energy.

  • In terms of national primary energy consumption, the electricity savings translate to a reduction of 17 Trillion Btu (TBtu) over the spring and fall Extended Daylight Saving Time periods or roughly 0.02 percent of total U.S. energy consumption during 2007 of 101,000 TBtu.

Writer and technologist. Author of fascinating articles about history, tech trends, and pop culture. billpetro.com @billpetro

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