History of Erasing Unpopular Leaders: Damnatio Memoriae

During the early Roman Empire two millennia ago, an emperor might be deified after he died if he was popular and good. (Think: the Divine Augustus.) Alternatively, if he was unpopular and wicked, he was “erased” from society’s memory.

The Latin term Damnatio Memoriae means the condemnation of the memory of a person by the Senate. The practice of the abolition of a…

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Writer and technologist. Author of fascinating articles about history, tech trends, and pop culture. billpetro.com @billpetro

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Bill Petro

Bill Petro

Writer and technologist. Author of fascinating articles about history, tech trends, and pop culture. billpetro.com @billpetro

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