History of New Year’s Day: Why on January 1?

We have the ancient Romans to thank for celebrating New Year’s Day on January 1. It wasn’t always that way. Previous civilizations celebrated it in March to observe the “new year” of growth and fertility.

Before calendars existed, the time between seed sowing and harvesting was considered a cycle or a year. But the Romans moved the date of New Year to January 1, as I’ll explain below…

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Writer and technologist. Author of fascinating articles about history, tech trends, and pop culture. billpetro.com @billpetro

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Bill Petro

Bill Petro

Writer and technologist. Author of fascinating articles about history, tech trends, and pop culture. billpetro.com @billpetro

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