History of the 19th Amendment: Women’s Right to Vote, 100 Years Ago

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Feminism

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50th anniversary of Women’s Suffrage in the United States, 5th Avenue, New York, New York, August 26, 1970. (Photo by Fred W. McDarrah/Getty Images)

African-American Women’s Suffrage

Contemporaneously with the mid-19th century suffrage efforts were the work of notable African-American suffragists, including Mary Church Terrel and Ida B. Wells-Barnett. Terell was one of the first African-American women to earn a college degree and championed both suffrage and civil rights. She helped form the Colored Women’s League of Washington (1849) and the National Association of Colored Women (1896). She was a founding member of the later National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in 1909.

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President Lyndon B. Johnson celebrates with Martin Luther King, Jr., Ralph Abernathy, and Clarence Mitchell after signing the Voting Rights bill into law on August 6, 1965.

Other Voting Milestones

All Native Americans were granted citizenship and the right to vote in 1924 through the Indian Citizenship Act, regardless of tribal affiliation. But while about two-thirds of Native Americans were already citizens, some western states continued to bar Native Americans from voting until 1948. In 1943, Chinese immigrants were given the right to citizenship and the right to vote by the Magnuson Act. In 1948, Arizona and New Mexico became the last states to extend full voting rights to Native Americans.

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Silicon Valley Tech Exec: Cloud, Data Storage, Automation. Author of fascinating articles about history, tech trends, andpop culture. Blog: http://billpetro.com

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